P&O Care proudly hosts a formal Certified Peer Visitor Program through the Amputee Coalition of America.  CPVs are patient volunteers that have adjusted well to limb loss, lead full active lives and are passionate about sharing their experience with others. Peer visitors meet patients and their families in person, via email or over the phone to listen and provide support following an amputation.

ampcoal logoCertified Peer Visitors (CPVs) are certified through an 8 hour intensive training course by Amputee Coalition of America, the nation’s leading non-non profit organization dedicated to improving the lives of amputees and their families. Since, 1993 the Amputee Coalition has trained thousands of peer visitors and equipped them with the skills and resources to help patients and their families through limb loss. They share their own personal experience with honesty and compassion while providing helpful insight and hope following amputation.

Peer Visitors are not paid by P&O Care and choose to give their time voluntarily. We work hard to match patients with a peer visitor of similar gender, age and level of limb loss. Your privacy and safety are important to us. We adhere to all HIPAA guidelines and ensure our CPVs have passed both a criminal background check and peer visitor certification test.

Since 1993,  the Amputee Coalition has equipped thousands of peer visitors with the skills and resources to help patients and their families through limb loss. All
certified peer visitors have completed an extensive training course, have a firm understanding of the rehabilitation process and believe in honest, compassionate conversations. We strive to  match patients with a peer visitor of similar gender, age and level of limb loss to ensure an impactful and positive experience.

Online form is below, for printable form please click here -> AMPUTEE PEER VISIT REQUEST

Ted K.

I remember thinking that living life with one leg was worse than not living life at all. I really, honestly did…[Then] a young boy with an artificial leg came into my hospital room for a visit. I don’t remember what he said. I don’t remember what he looked like. I was so transfixed with his prosthesis as he walked into my room. That’s all I needed to give me the personal strength to go on…

Irene D.

I believe the peer visit was one of the most important things that has been done for my brother…the psychological difference and the motivation I saw in my brother, the confidence and insight it gave him are wonderful.

Patty F.

I had a really supportive family, but I still felt alone until I met another amputee.